The 2018 ICMCTF banner design was developed by Beate Rabsch and Michael Stüber at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany.

SYMPOSIUM D
Coatings for Biomedical and Healthcare Applications

Technical Symposia: A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H
Topical Symposia: TS1 | TS2 | TS3 | TS4 | TS5

Symposium Chairs

Symposium Chairs
Jean Geringer, Mines Saint-Etienne, France, geringer@emse.fr
Margaret Stack, University of Strathclyde, UK, margaret.stack@strath.ac.uk

Symposium D focuses on the synthesis, characterization, and performance (both in vitro and in vivo) of coatings and modified surfaces designed for biomedical applications (biomaterials, bioimplants, biosensors, general health care, etc.). The symposium will be devoted to creating a platform, a friendly hub, in order to promote research discussions among materials scientists, the coating community, and clinicians. Papers are solicited in areas related to: bioactive and biocompatible coatings for orthopedic and dental implants, cardio-vascular stents, drug delivery, and biosensing; hydroxyapatite coatings; biomimetic and bio-inspired coatings; anti-bacterial, anti-biofouling, and eluting coatings; blood-compatible coatings; electrospun coatings; biofunctionalization of materials surfaces such as tissue-engineering scaffolds by wet chemical and plasma methods; cell-surface interactions; bio-lubrication and bio-tribology; and processing and characterization of biomaterial surfaces. With respect to interactions between the coating and the medium, there are investigations dedicated to study the corrosion degradation of the substrate. Moreover, some new fields are focused on the effect of the coating on the biological behavior, such as cell growth, cell adhesion, etc. The former topical symposium TS-1 has been incorporated with symposium D, as D4, Biointerfaces. Contributions in the fields of retrieval implant analysis, release of metal ions/particles, smart/intelligent surfaces, and potential clinical concerns will also be considered.

......................................................................

D1.  Surface Coatings and Surface Modifications in Biological Environments 

Session Chairs

Kerstin Thorwarth, EMPA, Switzerland, Kerstin.Thorwarth@empa.ch
Mathew T. Mathew, University of Illinois at Chicago, USA, mtmathew@uic.edu

This session focuses on coatings as well as on surface modifications for use in biomedical applications in order to improve performance characteristics or to add additional functions to an implant or surgical instrument. The functionalities of these coatings, surface modifications, and hydrogel development on the biomedical implants is to improve one or more attributes such as biocompatibility, cell proliferation and growth, suppression of restenosis, thrombus formation, antimicrobial behavior, and metallic ion release, load-bearing prostheses, corrosion resistance, wear resistance, etc. under in vitro and in vivo conditions.

Invited Speakers

John A Rogers, Northwestern University, USA
"Encapsulation Strategies and Device Designs for Flexible Electronic Implants"

Stephanie J. Bryant, University of Colorado, Boulder, USA
“Designing Hydrogels to Enhance Biomedical Implant Performance”

......................................................................

D2. Bio-corrosion, Bio-tribology, and Bio-tribocorrosion

Session Chairs

Anna Igual-Munoz, University of Valencia, Spain, anigmu@iqn.upv.es
Steve Bull, University of Newcastle, UK, steve.bull@ncl.ac.uk
Nuria Espallargas, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Norway
nuria.espallargas@ntnu.no

This session seeks papers on coatings designed for mitigating: bio- and tribo-corrosion at nano-, micro- and macro-scales, both in vitro and in vivo, applicable to a range of environments including replacement joints and dental materials. Papers on mechanistic descriptions, new fabrication processes, life cycle modelling, and mapping of the performance of thin films in tribo-corrosion environments are also welcome. The session will provide a forum to discuss the state-of-the art understanding of the degradation of thin films in a multidisciplinary format to include the action of corrosion, tribo-corrosion, and bio-tribo-corrosion environments on degradation mechanisms. We aim to explore new surface modification methods for bio- and tribo-corrosion applications. The biology influence on the corrosion and tribo-corrosion might be well investigated within the next few years. This session is a good opportunity for sharing recent results and discussing new routes for experiences, material design and modeling.

Invited Speaker

Hitomi Yamaguchi, University of Florida, USA
“Magnetic Abrasive Finishing of Additively Manufactured Components for Biomedical Applications”

......................................................................

D3. Medical Devices, Biosensors, and Biodegradation

Session Chairs

Jessica Amber Jennings, University of Memphis, USA, jjnnings@memphis.edu
Robin Pourzal, Rush University Medical Center, USA, robin.pourzal@gmail.com

Metallurgical coatings on, or nanoparticles within, the surface of implanted devices may be used to detect, diagnose, or respond to physiological or external stimuli. This session seeks to explore clinical applications and physiological responses to material systems used for implantable sensors, smart drug delivery, and tissue regenerative applications. Research into systems that sense, modify, or become triggered by physiological responses such as inflammation, growth, or biochemical release will be solicited for this session. Of particular interest are the biocompatibility of, and biological reactions to, implant surface coatings as well as particles of varying size and composition that were released either intentionally or due to wear and corrosion processes. In vitro findings will be considered in the context of clinical findings of adverse and advantageous local tissue reactions.

Invited Speaker

Caroline Hoemann, Polytechnique Montréal & George Mason University, Canada
“Optimization of Chitosan Surface Coatings That Guide Bone Tissue Repair in a Bioplastic Bone Void Filler”

......................................................................

D4. Biointerfaces: Improving the Cell Adhesion and Avoiding Bacteria Adhesion. What Kinds of Coatings Should be Used?

Session Chairs

Marcela Bilek, The University of Sydney, Australia, marcela.bilek@sydney.edu.au
Margaret Stack, University of Strathclyde, UK, margaret.stack@strath.ac.uk
Vincent Fridrici, Ècole Centrale de Lyon, France, vincent.fridrici@ec-lyon.fr

The motto related to this session is: improving cell growth on coatings and/or avoiding bacteria adhesion. It makes sense for optimizing biointerfaces of every biomaterial. This session focuses on the properties and control of the interface between the materials and eukaryotic or prokaryotic cells. Biointerfaces are important in a wide range of fields such as biomedical engineering, biomaterials, surface coatings, surface functionalization, cell biology, microbial infections, biophysics, biotechnology, and regenerative medicine. The aim of the session is to cover the biological, chemical, physical, and mechanical interactions that take place at the interface between living organisms and the material`s surface. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to, surface modification methods to control living organism responses, computational and mathematical modeling aspects in biofilms and soft tissues, adhesion and contact mechanics at biointerfaces, and biology-device interfaces. Environment-friendly deposition processes, the coating structure, physical, chemical, and biological coating properties, surface topography, surface characteristics, and growth defects are relevant features to be addressed in order to promote cell adhesion, such as in osseointegration. Other topics for consideration in this session are the progress in developing optimized textured surfaces to promote cell growth or efforts towards cell repulsion on engineered and coated surfaces.


Invited Speaker

Sandra Rodil, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Mexico
“Titanium Oxide Coatings to Improve Cell Adhesion and Differentiation”

 

 



Sponsored by:
AVS Advanced
Surface Engineering
Division